Normandy

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Home Page > Travelogues > France > Normandy (D-Day)

Subchapters in this travelogue:  Utah Beach ] Omaha Beach ] British/Canadian Sector ]

France

Normandy -- Home to The Many Sights of D-Day

France

Many significant battles from both World Wars were fought on French soil, and France was home to "Iron Mike" at Merderetmany war memorials large and small.  But, no battle has held the imagination and wonder of Americans, British, French, and Germans alike as the Battle of Normandy -- initiated on the 6th of June in 1944 with the D-Day invasion.  This battle was important not just because it turned the tide in the western front of Europe, but also because its legacy has helped unite the former combatants who would become Cold War friends through the rest of the century.  Further, it greatly helped to shape America's later role as a world superpower.

This legacy was rejuvenated in recent movies, most notably Steven Spielberg's 1998 classic, "Saving Private Ryan," and his immensely popular follow-up TV series "Band of Brothers."  Normandy American Cemetary at Omaha BeachYeah, I know some history buffs out there will nit at the details of these shows, but ultimately they were about the camaraderie among the soldiers.  It was the fears they faced and how they overcame them in the chaotic street fighting that followed for days and weeks after D-Day.  It reminded us of the tremendous sacrifice thousands before us made to preserve our freedom... something that we need to remind ourselves of on occasion.

But as realistically they tried to make the movies and TV shows, there was little to replace actually walking the Monument at Pegasus Bridge near Benouvilleground.  The screen cannot adequately represent the size and scope of the invasion, the utter confusion that reigned, nor all the different obstacles and challenges that caused the invaders so many difficulties.  These included the inability to completely erase the enemy strongholds with naval gunfire, the German flooding of the marshes, the slow advance during fighting in the hedgerows.  For my money, it took standing on the cliffs overlooking Pointe du Hoc to fully appreciate just how extraordinary it was for the Rangers to scale the heights carrying 100 pounds of equipment each and yet still having the energy to fight.  It took surveying the German defensive positions to understand why the Allies figured over 10,000 friendly forces would likely be killed on the first day.  It took looking over the bay at Arromanches to appreciate the tremendous Church at Sainte-Mere-Eglisefeat of building a whole functioning artificial harbor in three days.

The intent of this three-part travelogue was not to recite history -- there were plenty of websites available that will do better justice to the actual events.  (I have included a number of such sites in the Links at the bottom of the page, although I make no promises that these links are still active.)  The intent was to show you that the battle sites of Normandy, along with the nearby cities of Bayeux, Caen, and Cherbourg.  All of these locations were worth a visit, both for their grand scenery and their educational (and patriotic) value.  The D-Day locations were very well marked and loaded with quality museums and historical sites that promised to keep visitors interested and fascinated for days on end.

Oh, of course I'll sprinkle in little bits of history, just so you history buffs out there can nit at my details.  :-)

Regional Map:  Click on the indicated areas below to access a travelogue.  Red, green, or blue words link to the three chapters within this travelogue, while Black words will link to other travelogues in the France section.

France

France

Subchapters in this travelogue:  Utah Beach ] Omaha Beach ] British/Canadian Sector ]

Trip taken 31 May-4 June 2002 -- Page last updated 04 October 2006 -- (C) 2001 Tom Galvin

Useful Links:
bulletTourism:
bulletRegional Tourism Page - http://www.normandy-tourism.org
bulletHistory of the Battle of Normandy:
bulletUS Army Official History of D-Day Invasion - http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/wwii/7-4/7-4_cont.htm 
bulletUS Army Brochure on Omaha Beach - http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/wwii/100-11/100-11.htm 
bulletUS Army Brochure on Utah Beach - http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/wwii/utah/utah.htm 
bulletWest Point Atlas & Maps of European Theater during WW II (Map #'s 53-59) - http://www.dean.usma.edu/history/dhistorymaps/WWIIPages/WWIIEurope/WWIIEToC.htm 
bulletDetailed 2nd Ranger Co history of attack to seize Point Du Hoc -  http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/wwii/smallunit/smallunit-pdh.htm 
bulletUS Army Brochure on GEN Dwight Eisenhower - http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/wwii/7-4/7-4_cont.htm 
bulletUS Army Guide to the Order of Battle of ALL US Army Divisions in WW II -  http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/documents/ETO-OB/ETOOB-TOC.htm 
bulletOutline of Operations Overlord by the G4, ETO COMZ...Excellent overview of the G4's assessment of the important log issues facing the planners - http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/documents/WWII/g4-OL/g4-ol.htm 
 

   
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